Native american ethnobotany database

Malki Museum Press. Originally Published 1900, pages 80)

Melvin Gilmore: his work on Arikara Ethnobotany. Melvin Gilmore (1868-1940) was a pioneering ethnobotanist who wrote over 90 publications with a focus on recording the ethnobotany of 11 Native American tribes of the central US. He studied, published and recorded field notes on plant us by the Arikara, Dakota, Lakota, Ojibwe, Omaha, Osage, Oto ...Ethnobotany. Many Pacific Northwest tribes (Alaska Native, Gitksan, Okanagan-Colville, and others) have eaten the rootstocks as a vegetable (boiled or roasted). A decoction of root has been taken to treat joint pain, heart disease, tuberculosis, lung hemorrhage, skin sores, and rheumatism. Ground seeds have been used to make bread and porridge.

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(Smith, Huron H., 1923, Ethnobotany of the Menomini Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:1-174, pages 66) Meskwaki Drug, Antidiarrheal detail... (Smith, Huron H., 1928, Ethnobotany of the Meskwaki Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:175-326, pages 221) Meskwaki Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail...Based on 25 years of research that combed every historical and anthropological record of Native American ways, this unprecedented culinary dictionary documents the food uses of 1500 plants by 220 Native American tribes from early times to the present. Like anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman’s previous volume, Native American Medicinal Plants, this extensive …12 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for nose troubles. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, page 82. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for throat troubles.This research has yielded a treasure-trove of information whose magnitude will surprise even those familiar with the anthropological and botanical literature: it documents Native …American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles, pages 121) Saanich Drug, Blood Medicine detail... (Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1971, The Ethnobotany of the Coast Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, I and II, Economic Botany 25 (1):63-104, 335-339, pages 84) Saanich Food, Beverage detail...Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 16 Melissa officinalis L. Common Balm USDA MEOF2: Costanoan Drug, Pediatric Aid Decoction of plant used for infants with colic.Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Ethnobotany. Many Pacific Northwest tribes (Alaska Native, Gitksan, Okanagan-Colville, and others) have eaten the rootstocks as a vegetable (boiled or roasted). A decoction of root has been taken to treat joint pain, heart disease, tuberculosis, lung hemorrhage, skin sores, and rheumatism. Ground seeds have been used to make bread and porridge.Navajo Drug, Gland Medicine detail... (Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, pages 50) Paiute Drug, Analgesic detail... (Train, Percy, James R. Henrichs and W. Andrew Archer, 1941, Medicinal Uses of Plants by Indian Tribes of Nevada, Washington DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, pages 142)11 uses documented. Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 188)Grow your own herbal tea with adaptable, native ko'oko'olau | The Honolulu Advertiser | Hawaii's Newspaper. Grow your own herbal tea with adaptable, ...Kwakiutl, Southern Food, Unspecified detail... (Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Southern Kwakiutl Indians of British Columbia, Economic Botany 27:257-310, pages 292) Missouri River Indian Dye, Yellow detail... (Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena.Ethnobiology Databases. Native American Ethnobotany database. This interactive database was developed by Dan Moerman of the University of Michigan-Dearborn College. This is a database of plants used as drugs, foods, dyes, fibers (and more) which have been used by Native Americans.Hart, Jeffrey A., 1981, The Ethnobotany of the Northern Cheyenne Indians of Montana, Journal of Ethnopharmacology 4:1-55, page 6. Pinus ponderosa P.& C. Lawson. Ponderosa Pine. USDA PIPOP. Cheyenne Drug, Dermatological Aid. Pitch used to hold the hair in place. Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena.If a rigid approach is needed in ethnobotany, I see it rather in the proper identification of specimens (e.g. using barcoding), phytochemical investigations or in creating large, well-constructed and open-access databases (the Native American Ethnobotany website is a good example); or extensive regional or tribal monographs of traditional ...Ethnobotany Database. The development of the Prairie Ethnobotany Database is an essential part of our work and allows us to build on the leads provided by Native …There are advocates of large, centralised databases (Skoczen and Bussmann, 2006), which by their nature permit easier comparisons of data across regions (e.g. Moerman's database of Native American ...Douglas Fir. USDA PSMEM. Keresan Other, Ceremonial Items. Used to make costumes for dancers, prayer sticks and other ceremonial items. White, Leslie A, 1945, Notes on the Ethnobotany of the Keres, Papers of the Michigan Academy of Arts, Sciences and Letters 30:557-568, page 563. Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco.Nov 9, 2006 ... Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. [Online. Database] Last ... 1998 Native American Ethnobotany. Portland, OR: Timber Press ...A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. International Ethnobotany Database The International Ethnobotany Database (ebDB) is a new, public database that fills in the existing gaps in functionality, and provides a standardized, secure, independent, and non-commercial repository for ...Documented uses. 102 uses documented. Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail... (Hamel, Paul B. and Mary U. Chiltoskey, 1975, Cherokee Plants and Their Uses -- A 400 Year History, Sylva, N.C. Herald Publishing Co., pages 54) Cherokee Drug, Anthelmintic detail... (Taylor, Linda Averill, 1940, Plants Used As Curatives by Certain Southeastern Tribes ...11 uses documented. Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Pulmonary Aid detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa. National Museums of Canada. Mercury Series Number 65, pages 188)Sahnish (Arikara) Ethnobotany. Figure 1: A traditional Arikara burden basket with burden strap/tumpline made by SteštAhkáta of box elder (the white splints) and red-brown …Extended family and popular medicine on St. (Smith, Huron H., 1923, Ethnobotany of t Ethnobotany is the study of interrelations between humans and plants; however, current use of the term implies the study of indigenous or traditional knowledge of plants. It involves the indigenous knowledge of plant classification, cultivation, and use as food, medicine and shelter. Although most of the early ethnobotanists studied plant used ...(Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, pages 254) Dakota Drug, Analgesic detail... (Gilmore, Melvin R., 1913, Some Native Nebraska Plants With Their Uses by the Dakota, Collections of the Nebraska State Historical Society 17:358-70, pages ... Smith, Huron H., 1923, Ethnobotany of the Menomini Indians, Bulletin o Melvin Gilmore: his work on Arikara Ethnobotany. Melvin Gilmore (1868-1940) was a pioneering ethnobotanist who wrote over 90 publications with a focus on recording the ethnobotany of 11 Native American tribes of the central US. He studied, published and recorded field notes on plant us by the Arikara, Dakota, Lakota, Ojibwe, Omaha, Osage, Oto ... Kiowa, and Oklahoma were among the Native American tr

USDA Plants Database · NatureServe · Native American Ethnobotany (part of the University of Michigan - Dearborn) Michigan Natural Features Inventory. The ...Toxicodendron diversilobum (Torr. & Gray) Greene Common names: Pacific Poison Oak Species details (USDA): USDA TODI Documented uses 25 uses documented Costanoan Fiber, Basketry detail... (Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, pages 251)The Native American Ethnobotany Database has moved. The The Native American Ethnobotany Database, previously located at http://herb.umd.umich.edu, has moved to http://naeb.brit.org. You will be redirected to the home page in 10 seconds.Welcome. Welcome to the Native Medicinal Plant Research Program at the University of Kansas. Our program focuses on native plants and ethnobotany of the Midwest, Great Plains, and Mountain West. Our program began in 2009 as a broad-based search for medicinal compounds of plants in our region. Over 200 hundred plants were collected in the field ...

165 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 168) Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Cough Medicine detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa.Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 203 Sambucus racemosa L. Scarlet Elderberry USDA SARAR3: Bella Coola Food, Dried Food Berries formerly boiled into a thick sauce, dried and used for food.Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 15, 16 Bouteloua gracilis (Willd. ex Kunth) Lag. ex Griffiths Blue Grama USDA BOGR2: Navajo, Ramah Drug, Gynecological Aid Decoction of whole plant taken as a postpartum medicine.…

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12 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for nose troubles. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, page 82. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for throat troubles.Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases - Search plants by chemical, activity or ethnobotanical use. Includes list of browsable databases and rainforest information. Native American Herbal, Plant Knowledge - Describes healing plants used by northern Plains Indians, including photos. Also contains links to databases, books, and teacher resources.Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1971, The Ethnobotany of the Coast Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, I and II, Economic Botany 25 (1):63-104, 335-339, page 82. Arbutus menziesii Pursh. Pacific Madrone. USDA ARME. Cowichan Other, Preservative. Bark boiled and used for tanning paddles and fishhooks.

Native American Ethnobotany Database includes foods, drugs, dyes, fibers and other uses of plants (a total of over 44,000 items). This represents uses by 291 Native American groups of 4,029 species from 243 different plant families. 2009-06-03; in History ; David E. JonesNative American Ethnobotany. Hardcover – August 15, 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native …Ethnobotany is the study of interrelations between humans and plants; however, current use of the term implies the study of indigenous or traditional knowledge of plants. It involves the indigenous knowledge of plant classification, cultivation, and use as food, medicine and shelter. Although most of the early ethnobotanists studied plant used ...

USDA symbol: AMTRT2 ( View details at US Native American Ethnobotany Database. A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Tropical Plant Database. Created by Dr. Leslie Taylor this website provides free access to well-researched and referenced monographs on healing plants from the rain forest and nearby areas. Although the site offers ... Here's a link to the Native American EthnNative American Ethnobotany Database http://naeb.brit.or Latin names and native status (native vs. introduced) were verified in the Plant Database of the United States Department of ... Native American Ethnobotany. 1998, Portland, Oregon: Tiber Press ... Hancock REW, Towers GHN, Doxsee D, Stokes RW: Antimycobacterial polyynes of Devil's Club (Oplopanax horridus), a North American native medicinal ...Traditional folk medicine, on the other hand, dates as far back as 3700 B.C. Egypt (Fisher, 1997). Today, we call the study of these customs ethnobotany. Many tribes utilized forbs to treat headache pain: The Chippewa used spreading dogbane ( Apocynum androsaemifolium ), while the Navajo smoked coyote tobacco ( Nicotiana attenuata) and the ... The Central Puget Sound Chapter will loan out a slide s Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 47 Cucurbita pepo L. Field Pumpkin USDA CUPEP: Navajo, Ramah Food, Winter Use Food Pumpkin peeled, cut into strips, sun dried and stored in cellars or ground holes for winter use.Fewkes, J. Walter, 1896, A Contribution to Ethnobotany, American Anthropologist 9:14-21, page 18 Asclepias verticillata L. Whorled Milkweed USDA ASVE: Hopi Other, Tools Used as a planting stick. Fewkes, J. Walter, 1896, A Contribution to Ethnobotany, American Anthropologist 9:14-21, page 18 Asclepias verticillata L. Whorled Milkweed "African-American" is a divisive misnomer for nativThis database from the University of Michigan Rosaceae Rubus fruticosus L. Shrubby Blackberry Micmac - Drug View all documented uses for Bahia dissecta (Gray) Britt. Scientific name: Bahia dissecta (Gray) Britt. USDA symbol: BADI ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Ragleaf Bahia. Family: Asteraceae. Family (APG): Asteraceae. Native American Tribe: Keres, Western. Use category: Drug. Use sub-category: Emetic. Alaska Native Food, Fruit. Berries used for food. He Ethnobotanical: Native Americans throughout the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountain region used Nootka rose as food, medicine, and for ceremonial purposes (Moerman, 2012). Hips of all wild roses are high in vitamin C and are made into jams, jellies, syrups and teas. Revegetation: Nootka rose produces extensive rhizomes Grow your own herbal tea with adaptable, na[Navajo Food, Unspecified detail... (Castetter, Edward F., 19Apache, Chiricahua & Mescalero Food, Bread & Cake Combining Ethnobotany and Informatics to Discover Knowledge from Data. Publisher: Science Publishers, New Hampshire, USA. Editors: Rai M, Acharya D, Rios JL.